Articles Tagged with: street

AN IMAGE ALMANAC: 2015

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2015 IN PICTURES.


 

So, 2015 marked the beginning of my third year as a working photographer and this post is a simple look back at some of the images I’ve created for clients (and some just for myself) in the past 12 months.

Thank you if you’ve been reading my posts and thank you even more if you’ve been commenting sand sharing them. It’s great having you along for the ride. I wish you bagloads of prosperity, creativity and joy in 2016.

Images (click on each for full image):

Top: Carmen in rehearsals photographed for Glyndebourne Productions Ltd; Actress Caroline O’Hara for her publicity portfolio; Chocolate dipped oranges – commercial advertising photography for Ilze’s Chocolat.

Middle: Lookbook photoshoot for Siren Design/Charter Place (model: Nina Sever); UK Prime Minister David Cameron and President Xi of China photographed at London’s Mansion House for innovision/UKTI; Detail from ‘A Soho Day’ for Siren Design.

Bottom: Commercial advertising photography for Ilze’s Chocolat; Record Shop Day, Soho; Portrait from SCT at 50 reportage.


All images © James Bellorini. All rights reserved (apart from innovision/UKTI images which are held under Crown Copyright).

James is an editorial and documentary photographer working for the commercial and consumer markets. He started shooting professionally in 2013 and has since worked with advertising agencies, design agencies, entrepreneurs, performers, musicians, DJ’s, singers, models, and culture and entertainment organizations/brands. Recent clients include: Innovision, UKTI, Siren Design, Glyndebourne Productions Ltd, Stone Nest, The Old Vic etc. In September 2015 he joined the Redeye Network’s Lightbox programme for emerging photographers.


THE ETERNAL PARADE: STREET STYLES 1

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The Eternal Parade: Street Styles


This is the first post in an ongoing series indulging my fascination for the individual statements people make through the clothes they wear and the street styles, trends, and movements they are part of.

You wouldn’t know it to look at me now, but in my time I’ve been a 2-Tone Rude Boy in sta-press trousers and pork-pie hat dancing my teenage way through The Specials (spot them in one of the pics above), The Selector and Madness. A Smiths-era Morrissey clone (sans daffodil in back pocket). A polo-necked uber-beatnik complete with beard (before they were trendy). And a dread-locked festival-goer seeking sun, sea and surf as the 20th Century turned into the 21st.

And, no you’re not getting photographic evidence. A man has to preserve some sense of dignity without social media feasting on his fashion triumphs and tragedies!

Perhaps it’s being half-Italian or simply having lived through some of the great fashion/music/culture convergences of the late 20th Century, but I have always loved style and fashion. Especially that as expressed ‘on the streets’: the everyday offerings of individuality, sexuality, allegiances, and cultural signs that people wear to say ‘this is me’.

The 21st Century has broken down the boundaries of fashion. Just taking a walk along a city street can throw up cyber-Goths alongside skaters alongside couture divas alongside brand junkies or all of the above mixed in to something utterly new. Doesn’t matter. It just is. It is a never-ending parade. And it’s enthralling.

Well to me anyway.

It’s not an original idea I know, and has been done very beautifully elsewhere by people like The Sartorialist, but from time to time I’m going to photographically celebrate individuals who are making their own contribution to style, culture and street life.

It might be a haircut, a unique item of clothing, or a whole look. I don’t know until I see it.

I’m beginning here with a random selection of images taken in various locations without really knowing that they might become part of a series.

Top: Soho Hipster – Berwick Street, London.
Bottom: Festival Goers – Sonisphere Festival 2014; Punks – Venice Beach, California.

All images © James Bellorini


LEICA MEET: SELECTION OF EXCELLENCE

Leica Meet Selection Of ExcellenceI’m privileged to have this image chosen in the latest Leica Meet Selection of Excellence. You can see the full selection of images from all the photographers chosen here.

It was taken at Leica Meet Soho in early 2014. It now forms part of my ongoing ‘Polarities’ street project based in and around the Oxford Street/Centrepoint area of London.
 
Leica M with 35mm Summicron Lens.

Edited in Lightroom & Alien Skin Exposure 6.

Image © James Bellorini. All Rights Reserved.

James is an editorial and documentary photographer working for the commercial and consumer markets. He started shooting professionally in 2013 and has since worked with advertising agencies, design agencies, entrepreneurs, performers, musicians, DJ’s, singers, models, and culture and entertainment organizations/brands. Recent clients include: Innovision, UKTI, Siren Design, Glyndebourne Productions Ltd, Stone Nest, The Old Vic etc. In September 2015 he joined the Redeye Network’s Lightbox programme for emerging photographers. 


VOIGTLANDER 21mm IN 21 DEGREES

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Going wide-angle on the street with a Voigtlander Ultron 21mm lens & VSCO Film 06.


All Hallow’s Eve (or Halloween if you prefer) conjures up darkness, the night, the unknown and usually the first vestiges of Winter’s chill.
 
Not in London in 2014.
 
As the temperature gauges hit an unseasonably 21 degrees I decided there was synchronicity in taking to the streets with a new 21mm lens for one of my regular London photo-walks.
 
It was also an opportunity to edit the results through the new Visual Supply Company Film 06 presets pack which I’ve just added to my Lightroom workflow. If you’re not familiar with VSCO check them out here.
 
I’ve been meaning to use a 21mm lens for my documentary and street work for a while. I’m a devoted 35mm lens user for this kind of shooting. A 21mm is not a ‘natural’ choice when shooting with a rangefinder (as I do) due to needing an external viewfinder for composition. But, you know, I’m of the mind that experimentation and play are fundamental to image-making so I don’t really consider technicalities like that to be a reason not to try something new.

What I loved about using this focal length for this kind of work is the amount of context possible within the frame. For example, I’ve been doing a lot of work this year shooting Oxford Street and the surrounding area. Inevitably in a location like this, there’s so much going on in just a few square feet that the 21mm opens up the potential for loads of information and juxtapostions.
 
For the gear aficionados, I used a Voigtlander Ultron 21mm f1.8 lens on both Leica M (Type 240) and Fuji X-T1 (via a handy Fotodiox adapter ring). The Voigtlander is of solid metal build, heavier than a Summicron 35mm, and it is large. It easily blocks the bottom right hand corner of the Leica viewfinder which is why you have to use an external finder. The results with this lens are worth these changes. It’s sharp across the aperture range (about 90% performance wide-open compared to a Leica equivalent, but virtually indistinguishable stopped down). Focusing is very smooth and quick. Though once stopped down from f8 onwards there’s little need to fine focus as resulting depth of field is sharp through the image. Point and shoot becomes an easy proposition.
 
I’m going to keep experimenting with this lens and build it into my documentary kit. For further info on the Voigtlander 21mm lens and this focal length in street/documentary work try Steve Huff’s site or Joeri van der Kloet.
 
On to the VSCO Film presets.
 
I grew up with analogue cameras (my first camera was a Canon AE1 that I would ‘borrow’ from my Dad when he wasn’t looking) and, although I love digital photography’s ease-of-use, I still pine for the days of experimenting with film stock and developing it in my darkroom. Happily, the ability to recreate some of that experimentation keeps getting stronger with the likes of VSCO (and Alien Skin).
 

 


 
 
The new VSCO Film 06 pack takes some classic film stocks such as E100VS, Precisa, Sensia, Provia and Tri-X and focusses on a range of cross-processed and pushed/pulled variants of them. For all the images you see here I used a mix of those presets alongside tweaks in Lightroom and the extensive Film Toolkits that come as part of the VSCO packages. These offer custom grain, tonality, vignetting settings etc. I also layer some of my presets across the other film packs VSCO have produced in the past. For example the black and whites here use some of the Tri-X setting from this pack with additional layering from the Scala settings in film pack 04.
 
These presets are so thorough and extensive that you could spend hours tinkering with looks and image variations. What I have found over the time I’ve been using them all is that there are some looks that ‘settle’ into my work and style. Consequently my workflow tends to utilise those regularly with some customisation here and there. Patience, coffee, and a few hours to kill provides dividends with these presets. Often they’ve led me to reconsider the worth of some images that I wasn’t too sure about in their ‘raw’ state. Which turns these presets into valuable tools in anyone’s photographic kit, if you’re so inclined.

Voigtlander 21mm Ultron lens

 
All images shot on Leica M with 21mm Voigtlander Ultron lens and Fuji X-T1 with Voigtlander 40mm Nokton lens and developed in VSCO Film 06 (with additional work in the 04 pack for black and whites).

All images © James Bellorini 2015
 

 

 


BERWICK STREET, SOHO

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Leica M with Voigtlander Ultron 35mm f1.7 lens

Image © James Bellorini 2014. All Rights Reserved.

James is an editorial and documentary photographer working for the commercial and consumer markets. He started shooting professionally in 2013 and has since worked with advertising agencies, design agencies, entrepreneurs, performers, musicians, DJ’s, singers, models, and culture and entertainment organizations/brands. Recent clients include: Innovision, UKTI, Siren Design, Glyndebourne Productions Ltd, Stone Nest, The Old Vic etc. In September 2015 he joined the Redeye Network’s Lightbox programme for emerging photographers.