Category: Personal Work

SCRAPBOOKS ARE NOT CRAP BOOKS

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SCRAPBOOKS & CREATIVE PLAY.


What do you do with your old magazines or newspapers? Or (if like me you’re a photographer) your discarded contact sheets and unused prints that won’t ever see the light of day? Or even random bits of printed matter that catch your eye lying around on the street? Well call me old-fashioned, but I still gather them into what once upon a time we used to call scrapbooks.

I wasn’t even sure if scrapbooks still existed when I began writing this post (although I suppose Pinterest is a digital version of sorts), but a quick search on Amazon threw up a slew of very fancy versions so I guess they are still ‘a thing’.

Anyway, if you don’t know what one is, basically the idea is to collect your scraps and cutouts, get jiggy with glue and/or tape, and paste them into your book how you want. It’s lo-fi curation at it’s most hands on and tactile. But more than that it’s also a great form of creative freewheeling and play.

I tend to cut up a lot of my own work and use it quite brutally. In fact, as you can see from the images above, I often score and scratch the surfaces with a knife and then paint over them. Maybe that’s a healthy form of deconstruction?

I also give vent to verbal imagery and thoughts that don’t follow any logic or might rise as a suggestion from what I’ve pasted together. A kind of automatic writing.

And yes I confess to appropriating some found imagery and using it in contexts that wouldn’t normally be their home, so apologies if anyone out there is offended. I’m not making any money from them but using them because they are usually visually striking or speak to me in some way.

Anyway if cutting things up and sticking them in over-sized books appeals to you, I recommend it as a creative tool. It helps ‘out of the box’ thinking, breaks down ideas that have been stuck, preconceptions, or points to new directions. It also helps remove preciousness or perfectionism which in my case can only be a good thing.

Mostly though the value of a scrapbook is simply in the doing, the cutting and pasting, a form of collecting and ‘doodling’. The joy is enough.

Why am I highlighting this today in terms of my image making?

Well, recently I’ve given myself permission to try to unlearn elements of my practice as a photographer (and my ‘learned’ historic creativity in general) – to try to see again after half a lifetime of believing I was ‘seeing’. I’m hoping this will alter and improve my creative output. The scrapbook process is really helpful here. It’s pure playing. Trying to leap over or around logic and reason. And it often throws up unexpected things: unique juxtapositions, project ideas, a ‘hook’ or theme, who knows. 

One thing I have noticed is that a scrapbook distills the symbols and visual elements that I find appealing. It generates a kind of personal lexicon or dictionary and that is great to mine elsewhere in my work.

So forgive my indulgence in showing some pages here from my scrapbooks, but I hope that this might be impetus enough to send you on a quest to start (or keep going with) your own.

Actually there’s a great book called Photographer’s Sketchbooks published by Thames & Hudson that’s worth checking out – I’m not alone!!

So is there anyone else out there that indulges this passion for scrapbooks? I’d love to hear from you or better still share some of your pages if you can.

All images © James Bellorini 2015

James is a commercial, editorial and documentary photographer. He started shooting professionally in 2013 and has since worked with advertising agencies, design agencies, entrepreneurs, performers, musicians, DJ’s, singers, models, and culture and entertainment organisations/brands. Recent clients include: Siren Design, Glyndebourne Productions Ltd, Sonisphere UK, Stone Nest, The Old Vic etc.  

 


SMALL ACTS OF REBELLION

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ANALOGUE PHOTOGRAPHY & HOW IT HELPS ME CONNECT.


Style. Beauty. Authenticity. The unexpected.

If I’m not playing with at least one of those things in my photography and/or business at least once a week then I get jittery. Seriously. And I’m not talking something like coffee jitters, you know. It’s worse. Like a chunk has been taken out of my soul.

When that happens I need to shake the shackles off and make a stance for my creativity. That’s the way I keep going. So I find ways to experience one or more of those elements I’ve listed above through small acts of rebellion (SARs).

Take this little bunch of pics here. All shot over a month ago on a camera that uses FILM. Remember that stuff?

I think of analogue photography and the photos themselves as SARs.

Why?

Well the image/outcome can’t be the only thing I’m focused on, even though it does take up a huge part of  my attention. It’s the process as well. It has to be. It can’t be product product product all the time. Like the old adage says it’s not the destination, but the journey that’s important. For me, it’s taken a bit of time to understand that.

Which is also happens to be part of my point.

Time. Patience. Slowing down a bit. Breaking out from the digital treadmill. It runs against the grain these days. We’re often made fearful that we might ‘miss’ something or not be cutting edge enough if we haven’t for example sprung something new on social media in the last hour.

It makes sense to my creativity to throw into my photographic mix the discipline of slowness when I need it. Taking my foot off the photographic pedal. Allowing a whole month from the shutter-press to the point of editing and publishing personal photos (good or bad) is a small act of rebellion.

And what does that rebellion lead to? Fruit. Maybe not always immediate or ‘commercial’ fruit. But other kinds. In this here picture-monger it creates excitement, inner space and a greater awareness of the world around me and what I’m doing in it. Which photographically and creatively has to be a good thing.

And in this case there is also the greater appreciation of the medium itself: film, film cameras and all things analogue photography. Go get an old camera and walk out with it. It’s amazing how many conversations start because of this old contraption slung over my shoulder.

Then there’s the film ‘X’ factor.

Maybe you can’t see it in the pictures. I hope you can. Maybe it’s so sublime as to be like a breath of wind across the back of your hand. There is a depth and richness that comes from film (I want to say the word like I might say “ice cream” – playing it round my mouth, tasting it). The images are that much more sensual than the digital equivalent.

I’m often battling on the front between two forces: creativity and commerce. When they’ve signed their peace treaty and are working hand in hand that’s an amazing place to be. More often than not though, they are dividing their territories and building defences. Slowing down in this way actually helps them both come to terms with each other. Plus I have time to learn more about myself and my craft which soothes the creative beast in me and at the same time provides fuel for better photos (my products) for clients.

The business of making and creating is often conducted through a ‘cloud of unknowing’. Walking blindly in the cerebral dark guided by a tiny whisper of light in the guts, with limited conscious understanding of where you’re going. Yet knowing that you have to go, whatever. It’s the kind of place that, like a rebellion, lacks a sense of control. A place I’m hoping will always be a frontier of change.

If you’re interested, my ‘museum pieces’ are a Mamiya C220 TLR with 80mm lens and a Mamiya 7 with a 65mm lens. They help keep me sane.

I think of all of this a bit like this song by Parov Stelar – it’s kind of old and yet at the same time it very much of today as well. Have a listen and you’ll see what I mean.

All photography © James Bellorini 2015. All rights reserved.

James is an editorial and documentary photographer working for the commercial and consumer markets. He started shooting professionally in 2013 and has since worked with advertising agencies, design agencies, entrepreneurs, performers, musicians, DJ’s, singers, models, and culture and entertainment organizations/brands. Recent clients include: Innovision, UKTI, Siren Design, Glyndebourne Productions Ltd, Stone Nest, The Old Vic etc.


VENICE BEACH – ST. PATRICK’S DAY

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FROM MY USA PHOTO JOURNAL 2013

Photographed on St. Patrick’s Day. 
 
Canon 5D MkIII & Fuji X100

All images © James Bellorini 2013. All Rights Reserved.

James is an editorial and documentary photographer working for the commercial and consumer markets. He started shooting professionally in 2013 and has since worked with advertising agencies, design agencies, entrepreneurs, performers, musicians, DJ’s, singers, models, and culture and entertainment organizations/brands. Recent clients include: Innovision, UKTI, Siren Design, Glyndebourne Productions Ltd, Stone Nest, The Old Vic etc. In September 2015 he joined the Redeye Network’s Lightbox programme for emerging photographers. 


LEICA MEET: SELECTION OF EXCELLENCE

Leica Meet Selection Of ExcellenceI’m privileged to have this image chosen in the latest Leica Meet Selection of Excellence. You can see the full selection of images from all the photographers chosen here.

It was taken at Leica Meet Soho in early 2014. It now forms part of my ongoing ‘Polarities’ street project based in and around the Oxford Street/Centrepoint area of London.
 
Leica M with 35mm Summicron Lens.

Edited in Lightroom & Alien Skin Exposure 6.

Image © James Bellorini. All Rights Reserved.

James is an editorial and documentary photographer working for the commercial and consumer markets. He started shooting professionally in 2013 and has since worked with advertising agencies, design agencies, entrepreneurs, performers, musicians, DJ’s, singers, models, and culture and entertainment organizations/brands. Recent clients include: Innovision, UKTI, Siren Design, Glyndebourne Productions Ltd, Stone Nest, The Old Vic etc. In September 2015 he joined the Redeye Network’s Lightbox programme for emerging photographers. 


VOIGTLANDER 21mm IN 21 DEGREES

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Going wide-angle on the street with a Voigtlander Ultron 21mm lens & VSCO Film 06.


All Hallow’s Eve (or Halloween if you prefer) conjures up darkness, the night, the unknown and usually the first vestiges of Winter’s chill.
 
Not in London in 2014.
 
As the temperature gauges hit an unseasonably 21 degrees I decided there was synchronicity in taking to the streets with a new 21mm lens for one of my regular London photo-walks.
 
It was also an opportunity to edit the results through the new Visual Supply Company Film 06 presets pack which I’ve just added to my Lightroom workflow. If you’re not familiar with VSCO check them out here.
 
I’ve been meaning to use a 21mm lens for my documentary and street work for a while. I’m a devoted 35mm lens user for this kind of shooting. A 21mm is not a ‘natural’ choice when shooting with a rangefinder (as I do) due to needing an external viewfinder for composition. But, you know, I’m of the mind that experimentation and play are fundamental to image-making so I don’t really consider technicalities like that to be a reason not to try something new.

What I loved about using this focal length for this kind of work is the amount of context possible within the frame. For example, I’ve been doing a lot of work this year shooting Oxford Street and the surrounding area. Inevitably in a location like this, there’s so much going on in just a few square feet that the 21mm opens up the potential for loads of information and juxtapostions.
 
For the gear aficionados, I used a Voigtlander Ultron 21mm f1.8 lens on both Leica M (Type 240) and Fuji X-T1 (via a handy Fotodiox adapter ring). The Voigtlander is of solid metal build, heavier than a Summicron 35mm, and it is large. It easily blocks the bottom right hand corner of the Leica viewfinder which is why you have to use an external finder. The results with this lens are worth these changes. It’s sharp across the aperture range (about 90% performance wide-open compared to a Leica equivalent, but virtually indistinguishable stopped down). Focusing is very smooth and quick. Though once stopped down from f8 onwards there’s little need to fine focus as resulting depth of field is sharp through the image. Point and shoot becomes an easy proposition.
 
I’m going to keep experimenting with this lens and build it into my documentary kit. For further info on the Voigtlander 21mm lens and this focal length in street/documentary work try Steve Huff’s site or Joeri van der Kloet.
 
On to the VSCO Film presets.
 
I grew up with analogue cameras (my first camera was a Canon AE1 that I would ‘borrow’ from my Dad when he wasn’t looking) and, although I love digital photography’s ease-of-use, I still pine for the days of experimenting with film stock and developing it in my darkroom. Happily, the ability to recreate some of that experimentation keeps getting stronger with the likes of VSCO (and Alien Skin).
 

 


 
 
The new VSCO Film 06 pack takes some classic film stocks such as E100VS, Precisa, Sensia, Provia and Tri-X and focusses on a range of cross-processed and pushed/pulled variants of them. For all the images you see here I used a mix of those presets alongside tweaks in Lightroom and the extensive Film Toolkits that come as part of the VSCO packages. These offer custom grain, tonality, vignetting settings etc. I also layer some of my presets across the other film packs VSCO have produced in the past. For example the black and whites here use some of the Tri-X setting from this pack with additional layering from the Scala settings in film pack 04.
 
These presets are so thorough and extensive that you could spend hours tinkering with looks and image variations. What I have found over the time I’ve been using them all is that there are some looks that ‘settle’ into my work and style. Consequently my workflow tends to utilise those regularly with some customisation here and there. Patience, coffee, and a few hours to kill provides dividends with these presets. Often they’ve led me to reconsider the worth of some images that I wasn’t too sure about in their ‘raw’ state. Which turns these presets into valuable tools in anyone’s photographic kit, if you’re so inclined.

Voigtlander 21mm Ultron lens

 
All images shot on Leica M with 21mm Voigtlander Ultron lens and Fuji X-T1 with Voigtlander 40mm Nokton lens and developed in VSCO Film 06 (with additional work in the 04 pack for black and whites).

All images © James Bellorini 2015
 

 

 


BERWICK STREET, SOHO

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Leica M with Voigtlander Ultron 35mm f1.7 lens

Image © James Bellorini 2014. All Rights Reserved.

James is an editorial and documentary photographer working for the commercial and consumer markets. He started shooting professionally in 2013 and has since worked with advertising agencies, design agencies, entrepreneurs, performers, musicians, DJ’s, singers, models, and culture and entertainment organizations/brands. Recent clients include: Innovision, UKTI, Siren Design, Glyndebourne Productions Ltd, Stone Nest, The Old Vic etc. In September 2015 he joined the Redeye Network’s Lightbox programme for emerging photographers. 


THE SHOCK OF THE OLD

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The Shock of the Old: the inspiration of the Leica rangefinder.


In this post I want to look a little bit at how I’ve recently turned to the ‘past’ for inspiration. In this case Leica inspiration.

For about a year I’ve had an ongoing battle justifying to myself whether or not I should buy into the Leica ‘M’ rangefinder brand. I had dreamed of owning one for the majority of my life. Somewhere back in time, I had promised myself that one day I would own my very own Leica. I knew all about the heritage, history and hefty costs of the system.  And recent developments in CSC systems, including the great Fuji X system, had compromised any clear decision-making process.

But life is short and I have been fortunate enough recently to be in a position where I could finally take the ‘leap’ into the system and purchase a barely used M Type 240 digital rangefinder at a bargain price.

Thankfully, all my preconceptions of working with this system have been proven correct. If not surpassed. The experience of photographing with this camera is, for me, truly inspiring. I have experienced what I would term a ‘shock of the old’.

Leica Inspiration - Paris To Venice Train

French dawn (from Paris To Venice Train sequence). Leica M (240) with 50mm Summicron lens.

Why old?

Well, at heart this is still the same camera Leica came out with originally in the early 1950’s. It’s built around the same accurate focusing mechanism (a manual rangefinder) and has everything a photographer needs boiled down to the bare minimum: i.e. set it and forget it.

That’s not to say the camera in itself is technically retrograde in any way. It isn’t.

But the process of approaching photography with this system leans toward the retro. It immediately brings back sensations and experiences I had when I first picked up a camera in the mid-1980’s and began to take pictures. In those days it was my Father’s Canon AE1 with an amazing 50mm f1.4 lens that I borrowed. Time stood still. I felt like I was able to see under the skin of the world. What a beautiful endeavor: to put a frame around something and freeze it for all time!! In a sense every camera I have used since has been a device with which I have tried to replicate that experience. Some have come close. But none have brought me those same sensations as the Leica has.

It’s not just the technical aspects of using a Leica rangefinder: the engagement with subject through the viewfinder, the simplicity of the camera hardware, the quality of lenses (homegrown and third-party). All these things make photography with this system a sublime experience and, as ever with a camera that is a true working tool, it gets out of the way and lets me concentrate on what I’m looking at. But more than that, it is the emotional state it puts me into. In me it engenders an eagerness to see the world afresh daily. To exploit all the possibilities of light and story. And these things remind me of what really lie at the heart of photography for me. No matter what your experience level or supposed ‘standard’ it’s the emotional connection we have with the world around us and how we express that connection that makes for photographic joy and passion.

I gave a talk last week to a group of people from all sorts of backgrounds (artists, entrepreneurs, business people) about the nature of creativity and it’s correlation to play and playfulness. My focus was on how and why we re-discover the innocence we experienced as children when allowed to create without the hindrances of judgement, critical appraisal and peer pressure. When we are able to express humbly from the soul with a real sense of fun, freedom and adventure. The Leica has so far encouraged in me that state of being. It is willing to go with me however I want to go. It is a ‘yes’ device.

I’m not saying other camera’s might not be. But this one does it for me.

It also challenges me. Challenges any technical knowledge that had become ‘wooly’ due to other cameras doing too much of the thinking for me.

So for those of you who have ever considered buying into the Leica family and can afford to, I recommend it from with all my heart. But for those of you who can’t or do not want to, then try treading the Manual road again this week. Switch the auto-focus off, take control of the shutter speed and aperture and enjoy the freshness and real ‘seeing’ this brings – acknowledge that you are making images not just taking them, that you are making creative and playful decisions. Or maybe you still have a 35mm film camera – dust it off, take it for a whirl and see if that changes the way you approach your image-making. Then see where that takes you just for the fun of it. Creativity is, after all, about experimentation in a nurturing atmosphere: a space without reproach or market trends. We as photographers (or whatever your background) have to make ourselves get away from the constant requirements of our businesses and touch base with what it was that originally spoke to us about photography.

All images © James Bellorini 2014