Category: Commercial Photography
2016 THROUGH THE LENS

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2016: One Year Through The Lens


 

The end of a year is always time to assess where we’ve come from.

And, of course, where we’re going.

And Wow! 2016. What a year it’s been for so many reasons. It will go down in history as having been one of the most polarising, hilarious, and shocking.

However, for myself as a freelancer, it has been about risk-taking. Pushing the boundaries of my comfort zones.

While our brains are great things, they often focus on the potential negatives of big decisions that have to be made whilst running a business. Even a business of just one person. Perhaps even more so. They often try to talk us out of making those decisions. After all they are always seeking out certainty and security. As a result, we become prone to fears which may or may not exist.

Therefore, the big question becomes: what’s the price of staying where I am?

I had come to a point in early 2016 when I had to answer that question myself. As a result I chose to shift my home and business. In  March I moved out of the London/M25 catchment area, where I’d lived and worked for more than a decade, and moved to Brighton on the UK’s South Coast.

I’m lucky enough to say that the move has paid off.

It’s opened up opportunities. And avenues of change. Plus, in addition to living by the sea (always a bonus), I’ve already met and worked with some incredible people. These include artists, entrepreneurs, DJs, press officers, and award-winning designers. And I’m giving some of them a ‘visual heads-up’ in the gallery above. They deserve it. They’re examples of risk-takers. Nearly all of them creating in some way.

I’ve spent 2016 deliberately maintaining a path of diversity.

Choosing not to pursue a specific single photographic niche. This goes against the received ‘wisdom’ of many business advisors. However, more important to me is my approach to my craft, my business, and to people in general. That’s what I’ve been concentrating on.

What does that look like?

Well, it includes the obvious things of being technically and creatively adept and versatile, and offering great service. Yet more than that it’s about being a problem solver, being responsive, focusing on engagement with people and clients. Aiming more and more to be myself.

Perhaps it’s my own A.D.D. but I like to keep things fresh and not stand still. Never resting on my laurels.

I’m happy to say that I’ve seen results from a slew of new clients, stronger working relationships with existing clients, and an upsurge in the range of what I shoot and offer. As a result, despite so many factors beyond my control, I’d say 2016 has been a truly exciting and challenging ride.

Ultimately, this is an opportunity to say a big thank you to my clients: the new ones, and those that I’ve been privileged to shoot for again and again.

Thanks for reading this and taking an interest in my work.

Whatever you do, wherever you are,  I wish you happy holidays, happy Christmas, and a prosperous and exciting New Year.
 


 

Gallery:

2016 through some of the images I shot during the past 12 months.

  1. ‘Of Riders & Running Horses’ performed by Still House at the National Theatre River Stage Festival.
  2. Actor Caroline O’Hara photographed in Brighton for her publicity portfolio.
  3. Handmade vegan apple crumble photographed for Brighton-based fitness and health expert Everfitt.
  4. Custom car photographed at the Furle Hill Climb 2016.
  5. Portrait of a Georgian re-enactor as part of my personal project ‘Artificial Bodies?’.
  6. Sola Akingbola performing at the National Theatre River Stage Festival.
  7. Burlesque performer Lady Marmaduke photographed for her publicity portfolio.
  8. A product lifestyle image for toys and games in the Glyndebourne Christmas catalogue.
  9. The Cunning Little Vixen in rehearsal, for Glyndebourne Productions Ltd.
  10. Connections at 21 performance at The National Theatre.
  11. Norman Cook (aka Fatboy Slim) DJ’ing at baby Loves Disco for Brighton Fringe.
  12. Actor and singer Olivia Crow photographed for her publicity portfolio.
  13. Handmade chocolate truffles photographed for artisanal chocolatier Ilze’s Chocolat.
  14. The Glory performing at the National Theatre’s River Stage Festival.
  15. Portrait from my ongoing personal project ‘The Reveries Of Kitty Pridden’. 

All images © James Bellorini 2016. All rights reserved.

I’m a commercial and editorial photographer. I started shooting full-time in 2013. Subsequently I have worked with advertising agencies, design agencies, entrepreneurs, performers, musicians, DJ’s, singers, models, and culture and entertainment organizations/brands. Recent clients include: The National Theatre, Innovision, UKTI, Siren Design, Glyndebourne Productions Ltd, Stone Nest, The Old Vic etc. In September 2015 I joined the Redeye Network’s Lightbox programme for emerging photographers and I’m a founding member of the photography collective RISE. 


EMPIRE BURLESQUE: JOYS OF COLLABORATION

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COLLABORATING ON A PHOTOSHOOT.


If you’re anything like me – a freelancer working for yourself – then you probably don’t get to collaborate that often. I mean I spend about 80% of my time working on my own. That’s the nature of the game I guess. Photography is, in the main, a solo pursuit.

Sure, when I’m on a shoot I’m with my clients and subjects (which are mini-collaborations in themselves), but even then I’m often working alone before the shoot and then behind the camera (unless the budget allows for an assistant).

When I’m editing it’s hours (days more often) in front of the computer with just Photoshop, Deezer and coffee to keep me company.

The plus sides of working this way are that you just get on and work. There’s rarely anyone to wait for or delegate to. Any decisions that need to be made on the whole can be made in the time it takes to brew another cup of coffee then go ahead and take action.

The flip side is that often we can get overly used to regular ways of thinking and routines which can get stale, safe and comfortable. And over time that can lead to reduced energy and creativity.

As we all know, the best ways to learn and grow are to get outside our comfort zones and challenge those feelings of safety and comfort.

That’s why I jump at the chance to collaborate with people as often as I can.

It’s why when talented make-up artist and stylist Lucille Dee (www.lucilledee.com) asked me to work on a shoot with burlesque performer Lady Marmaduke (check out her Facebook page here) in order to showcase how Lucille uses Urban Decay cosmetics (www.urbandecay.co.uk) and get some publicity shots for Lady M, I said yes straight away.

And it was, as I anticipated, a breath of fresh air for a number of reasons.

Firstly, I was working with people engaged in their passions, what’s hugely important to them and, above all, they do it with dedication and always to the best of their abilities.

Secondly, I was called upon to work with minimal preparation. Lucille was organizing all the styling and looks, the props and the location (Patterns bar/club on Brighton seafront). Plus my schedule wouldn’t allow for a recce of the location in advance, so I’d have to make decisions about kit from what info I could glean from Lucille in advance and a quick search of the venue’s website. Then trust the equipment I had with me on the day, rather than carting every item of kit with me ‘just in case’.

Finally, I’d not worked with the subject/model Lady Marmaduke before – and that is always an immediate challenge: breaking the ice, making them feel confident and comfortable, and building trust and complicity between you.

There were a lot of potential pit-falls.

But one thing I find that when you dive in: things happen. You reinforce your skills and learn new ones.

And it’s one of the beauties of working with other creative people: there’s a freshness that comes from combined ideas and effort; working things out in real time with an idea or two in mind to kick start from, seeing where you are led along the way often influenced by unforeseen elements in the shoot.

Take for example the two wildly coloured images (above and right): these were shot in the ladies toilets and lit by three small overhead lights (a red, green and blue) that are part of the decor. It was actually very dark in there. However the light was so exciting to us that we had to try and find a way to make it work. To me they came out pretty good I think (with a bit of post-production work thrown in).

Or in the more ‘panoramic’ dressing room image below: actually a reflection photographed in a huge wall mounted mirror that gave a more of a wide-angle view than we could get if we’d tried shooting it in the normal, straight-on way.

And there’s other things to enjoy: other people’s ideas, their time-frames, what they propose in the moment all must be taken into account and worked with. So by remaining flexible and not ‘stuck’ to every one of your own ideas, then collaboration is ultimately challenging and fun.

That’s great.

And best of all it shows in the end results.

One of the additional benefits of collaboration of course is that you build your network and even start building potential teams that you could work with again and again. And who knows where that could lead?

So, if you’ve never collaborated on a project of any size, then have a go. It’s worth it.

And if like me you have, then do it again whenever you can. I know I will.

If you have experiences of collaborating I’d love to hear about them and what you’ve learnt.

The tech stuff:
All images shot on  Canon 5D MKIII with Canon 35mm, 50mm & 85mm lenses and a 110cm EXPRO hand held reflector. Edit & post-processing done in my usual mix (collaboration?) of Adobe Photoshop and Alien Skin Exposure 7.

All images © James Bellorini 2016. All rights reserved.

James is an editorial and documentary photographer working for the commercial and consumer markets. He started shooting professionally in 2013 and has since worked with advertising agencies, design agencies, entrepreneurs, performers, musicians, DJ’s, singers, models, and culture and entertainment organizations/brands. Recent clients include: Innovision, UKTI, Siren Design, Glyndebourne Productions Ltd, Stone Nest, The Old Vic etc. In September 2015 he joined the Redeye Network’s Lightbox programme for emerging photographers. 


AN IMAGE ALMANAC: 2015

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2015 IN PICTURES.


 

So, 2015 marked the beginning of my third year as a working photographer and this post is a simple look back at some of the images I’ve created for clients (and some just for myself) in the past 12 months.

Thank you if you’ve been reading my posts and thank you even more if you’ve been commenting sand sharing them. It’s great having you along for the ride. I wish you bagloads of prosperity, creativity and joy in 2016.

Images (click on each for full image):

Top: Carmen in rehearsals photographed for Glyndebourne Productions Ltd; Actress Caroline O’Hara for her publicity portfolio; Chocolate dipped oranges – commercial advertising photography for Ilze’s Chocolat.

Middle: Lookbook photoshoot for Siren Design/Charter Place (model: Nina Sever); UK Prime Minister David Cameron and President Xi of China photographed at London’s Mansion House for innovision/UKTI; Detail from ‘A Soho Day’ for Siren Design.

Bottom: Commercial advertising photography for Ilze’s Chocolat; Record Shop Day, Soho; Portrait from SCT at 50 reportage.


All images © James Bellorini. All rights reserved (apart from innovision/UKTI images which are held under Crown Copyright).

James is an editorial and documentary photographer working for the commercial and consumer markets. He started shooting professionally in 2013 and has since worked with advertising agencies, design agencies, entrepreneurs, performers, musicians, DJ’s, singers, models, and culture and entertainment organizations/brands. Recent clients include: Innovision, UKTI, Siren Design, Glyndebourne Productions Ltd, Stone Nest, The Old Vic etc. In September 2015 he joined the Redeye Network’s Lightbox programme for emerging photographers.


UK CHINA BUSINESS SUMMIT 2015

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EVENT REPORTAGE AT THE UK/CHINA BUSINESS SUMMIT.


Last week I was commissioned by a UK events company to document the UK China Business Summit at Mansion House where the UK government deepened it’s trade links with China. This was alongside the state visit to the UK by the Chinese President Xi.

In the slideshow above and the images below you see speakers, delegates, as well as the more familiar faces of Professor Brian Cox, UK Prime Minister David Cameron, and President Xi of China.

This was an unusual job as it crossed the line between events work (which I’ve photographed before) and press photojournalism (which I’m much less used to). Each have their own ways of working and it was a healthy challenge to be bridging both disciplines. It kept me on my toes that’s for sure and pushed me non-stop for six hours.

Whatever the politics involved in the day, it was good to be photographing an historic event and, on occasion, to be the sole photographer given access to certain parts of the summit (some of which are presented in the slideshow above).

I guess that’s what I love about photography: having a watchful eye and persevering enough to be in the right place at the right time.

All images James Bellorini © Crown Copyright 

For the tech heads: all images were shot using a Canon 5D MkIII or a Fuji X-T1

James is a commercial, editorial and documentary photographer. He started shooting professionally in 2013 and has since worked with advertising agencies, design agencies, entrepreneurs, performers, musicians, DJ’s, singers, models, and culture and entertainment organizations/brands. Recent clients include: Siren Design, Glyndebourne Productions Ltd, Sonisphere UK, Stone Nest, The Old Vic etc. In September 2015 he joined the Redeye Network’s Lightbox programme for emerging photographers. 


LOOKS OF LOVE: ARTIST HEADSHOTS PART 3

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GETTING THE MOST FROM YOUR HEADSHOT.

Part 3 – Delivery.


The third and last post in a short series about getting the most from your headshot photo shoot. With a special offer for readers of this blog – read on Macduff…

In the first post we looked at The Objective: what you want to achieve with your new headshot. And in the second it was the turn of Preparation: what you need to consider in the run up to the shoot.

So, we come to the last part of this process:

Delivery

Delivery is not just how you receive your images (although I will touch on that below), but what I believe you should expect from your photographer and how they make you feel before, during and after shooting has begun.

You must feel as comfortable and confident in front of the camera as possible. That’s the basic springboard for everything that will happen in the shoot and how you will get what you want from it.

For some sitters that confidence will come easier than others. But it’s why I suggested the importance of meeting your photographer beforehand. It helps break the ice: you aren’t walking into a photo shoot with a total stranger behind the camera.

Two of my core values as a photographer are relationship and collaboration. The best headshots are created together: it’s a collaboration between the sitter and the photographer, and that’s a great approach.

The best headshot photographers will be working to maintain that positive atmosphere in which you can respond confidently. So, if you’re feeling rushed, ignored or ‘a bit like a piece of meat’ (and I’ve heard that before) then something is wrong.

And it isn’t you.

Remember you are your brand. Nearly every actor, artist, musician etc I know and have photographed works exceptionally hard to do what they do. So, don’t expect your brand to receive anything less than the focus, respect and sensitivity it deserves.

Any headshot/portrait photographer worth parting with your hard-earned cash for knows it’s all about YOU not them. They steer the experience to that end. Making you feel comfortable and confident so that you feel good, look good and increase the chances of getting exactly the photos you’re after.

How might this manifest itself during the shoot?

Well, I believe some good indicators are:

  1. Technical competence and excellence – If the photographer is confident in what they are doing that helps you to be confident in what you are doing (in some ways it’s a bit like the performer/audience relationship). A photographer who is stopping every few seconds to twiddle with a setting on the camera because they haven’t prepared (or don’t know their stuff) is not good for the flow of the shoot and will probably make you nervous.
  2. Showing you some of the results as they come. That way the photographer can explain if anything is or isn’t working and you can both see whether the shoot is moving in tune with your goals. It’s a great opportunity for you to add suggestions too. On location you will be looking at the small screen on the rear of the camera, so really take a moment to look. In the studio it might well be that the photographer has the camera ‘tethered’ to a laptop which means you can both view the results much more clearly.
  3. The photographer regularly checks in with how you are feeling. Might seem a bit over-the-top but think about it this way: a photo shoot is a fun process (or at least it should be) but it is possible that feelings of self-consciousness or vanity will come up. And that’s ok. A good photographer must be sensitive to that stuff. Checking in with you helps to gauge how you are doing and helps support the energy of the shoot.

I also like to give a bit of room for ‘play’. Maybe it’s the last 10 minutes of the shoot, once we’re happy the main shots are captured, and we just loosen the reins of the brief. That’s often when great additional portfolio shots will come. This will be ‘to taste’ but I try never to rule it out and it’s not something you should expect from every photographer.

What should you expect after the shoot?

  1. A selection gallery. It’s usually the case that the photographer will provide some form of private, password protected online gallery. The gallery is there for you and your agent/manager to make the best selection from. Let’s say there are on average between 200-400 shots taken at a two hour headshot shoot. The photographer will get rid of the obvious rejects, e.g. the shots where you blinked as the shutter fired, as well as any duplicates.
  2. To help with this the photographer may flag up the file numbers of the images that fit the objectives the best. They may also make suggestions as to which of the other images are strong. Either way, at the end of the day the choice is yours and you may or may not disagree with the suggestions. That’s ok. You’re the customer. However, it can be daunting to view so many images of yourself and a second or third opinion will help. I like to give the option as part of my service.
  3. Agreed edits and retouching. Photographers will have different packages and rates depending on their experience and reputation. You and your photographer will agree your package and how many of the images you select for final edit will obviously be finalised in your discussions and any written agreement/contract (NB I can’t emphasise enough the importance of a signed written agreement/contract to protect you and the photographer – without one there are no guarantees, remember Matt Damon in the first post?). However many final edits your package covers, I firmly believe you should expect a professional edit and retouch. This can include spot removal, skin tone retouching etc. I offer this as part of my packages from the get go but some photographers may see this as an additional.
  4. Finally, image delivery in both high  and low resolutions. This means you can use your images for printing and for websites/social media etc. as soon as they are delivered. I offer colour and monochrome versions just to make life easier but again that might not be every photographers method. How those images are delivered may vary but nearly every photographer these days ought to provide another online gallery from which you can download everything in one go. There will occasionally be a need for a disc or USB stick of images as well, but chances are these will cost extra.

And what about printing? Well I no longer offer printing in my packages because it means additional mark up to my sitters which I don’t want to pass on. Especially as the printed headshot is becoming less and less of a necessity in the quantities they used to be. Of course if necessary I can deliver prints but I prefer to leave the option open to my clients to source the best value printing for themselves from companies such as VISUALEYES. Yet again this may vary from photographer to photographer.

So that’s it. I hope you’ve enjoyed my short but concentrated take on the headshot process. Some of it might seem obvious but it’s surprising what we can forget. More often than not good photography comes from common sense and simple problem solving.

I hope you’ve also got a taste for what a positive experience a headshot photo shoot can be. One that has the potential to help get you closer to where you want to be and how ‘Brand You’ can best be represented photographically.

If you’re ready to dive in and create some great headshots with me then check out my headshot and portfolio packages here to make a booking (and if you quote the code: LooksLove15 you’ll be in for a 10% discount) or if you just want to ask any questions rising from these posts then feel free to drop me a line.

Above all, I hope the three posts in this headshots series help you move towards the images you are looking for and that help you to shine.

Image credits (from left to right): Actress Caroline O’Hara; Actor Daniel Crow; Soprano Joelle Harvey (photographed with kind permission in The Old Green Room, Glyndebourne).

All images © James Bellorini.

James is a commercial, editorial and documentary photographer. He has over ten years experience in the arts and entertainment industries and has worked for internationally recognised brands including Glyndebourne, The Royal Shakespeare Company, and The Old Vic. His portrait and headshot clients include actors, musicians, writers, artists, international singers, entrepreneurs and corporates. He is a member of the Redeye Network and a participant in their Lightbox program for emerging photographers.


LOOKS OF LOVE: ARTIST HEADSHOTS PART 2

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Getting The Most From Your Headshot Session.

Part 2: Preparation.


In the first post of this short series about getting the most from your headshot photo shoot, we looked at The Objective: what you want to achieve with your new headshot. If you didn’t see it then please have a read here.

In this post we’re going to take a little look at the second element in the process:

Preparation.

So, first things first: book your photographer early i.e. in plenty of time for the deadline by which you need the headshot photos.

Next: once you’ve booked them, if it’s possible, try to meet the photographer well before the shoot.

You might think it unnecessary to do this, but in my experience the best results always come when the sitter and I meet beforehand.

It doesn’t need to be long: an hour over a coffee is enough. Ideally this might be around a month before the shoot or in plenty of time to sort out any further needs, locations, questions etc.

It also gives me the opportunity to get a sense of you in space: how your face works (yep!) and what light does to it. Plus I get to learn about your goals and ambitions, and discuss what you want to achieve with the photos. All that thought you’ve put into your objectives now gets the chance to be aired.

I always factor this level of contact into any headshot or portrait booking I get, but don’t expect all photographers to be the same. A phone/Skype conversation might well be enough, and sometimes has to be due to schedule issues.

Finally, it’s worth noting that this contact serves to break the ice before there’s a camera in the room. The more relaxed you are with your photographer, when it comes to shooting, the better. Of course, good photographers will always be working to make you feel comfortable and confident in front of the camera, but let’s leave that to the final post in this series.

The next thing to think about and discuss is whether you want studio or location-based shots? Or both perhaps?

Outdoor location headshots are fine and they work really well. But they bring with them some potential photographic hazards: weather conditions (don’t forget these have the potential to mess up your hair etc) and, depending on the location, other people/passers-by who can easily make you feel self-conscious or interrupt the shoot.

Remember the shoot is time-limited, so maximizing it is important.

I often recommend interior shots – whether that’s for natural light set-ups on location (see the image top right) or a studio set-up (top left).

Studio shots are always going to be a bit more expensive, but they guarantee great light, more control and in many ways a more relaxed space to shoot in.

Clothing – it’s really worth nailing what you’re going to wear in light of the objectives you’ve considered.

Know what colours and styles look best on you. Plain clothing is always going to be better than patterned for a headshot. And remember images are always shot in colour these days and only converted to black and white if necessary, so really think about what works with your skin tone.

If you don’t know what works, go and try stuff on in front of the mirror. Take some selfies. Be your own stylist (unless you can afford to pay for one, in which case even better).

Always be ready to bring at least two clothing options. Don’t just turn up to the shoot saying “I just brought a black T-shirt is that ok?” (believe me I’ve been there).

And don’t be afraid to throw something unusual into the mix – some of the shots my clients rave about as being most successful are those where they are wearing something that is not their every day wear. Often that’s something that moves them closer to the goals they’ve set for their headshots.

The next thing to discuss is make-up. And hair (that’s you too boys!).

In my opinion, where make-up is concerned, less is more in a headshot unless you have a very specific stylised look/brand that you need to portray. It’s worth having a natural foundation to minimise shine and to bring some with you for the shoot. And ladies, minimal eye make-up is good too. Heavy mascara for example just doesn’t work in this context unless, as I say, it’s for a stylised look.

Hair – this can actually make or break a shoot. If you need to get it cut or styled then do it. Either way always take a brush and/or comb and a mirror if you’re shooting on location. Guys if you need gel, then use gel but keep it real looking. Guys and gals remember if you’re shooting outside, the wind, no matter how weak, is going to move everything around so you have to factor that in. It might not always be possible to find a completely sheltered outdoor location.

Finally, remember to clean your teeth and to leave plenty of travel time so that you’re not stressed or antsy when you arrive.

Preparation is everything and it shows. Not only does it maximise your time in front of the camera but it also makes the most of the money you’re investing in the photos.

Often you might have two hours max to get everything in the can. It might seem like a lot but it passes very fast. Sure you can book for longer or more than one session (and I would always encourage that) but it’s not always financially feasible. So, in the main we are looking to get as many quality images as possible in 120 minutes.

If that means starting the process toward a photo session a good couple of months before your deadline then do it.

I hope this has helped to give you at least an overview of what to consider in the run up to a shoot.

In the final post we’ll look at the shoot itself: what you should expect from your photographer during the shoot and after.

Of course if you want to dive in and create some headshots together then check out my headshot and portfolio packages here to make a booking or if you just want to ask any questions rising from these posts then feel free to drop me a line.

All images © James Bellorini

James is a commercial, editorial and documentary photographer. He has over ten years experience in the arts and entertainment industries and has worked for internationally recognised brands including Glyndebourne, The Royal Shakespeare Company, and The Old Vic. His portrait and headshot clients include actors, musicians, writers, artists, international singers, entrepreneurs and corporates. He is a member of the Redeye Network and a participant in their Lightbox program for emerging photographers.


LOOKS OF LOVE: ARTIST HEADSHOTS PART 1

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Getting the most from your headshot session.

Part 1: The Objective.


Recently the actor Matt Damon had a bad experience with a headshot photographer. The results were, well, frightening actually! Great if he wants to play some bizarre alien psycho fiend, but not much else. Take a look here.

Actually, the article is from The Onion so it could well be a joke.

But (genuine or not) it does flag up an important question when it comes to artist headshots (or any portrait photography you might use for publicity or marketing purposes). That is, how can you get the best results from the photoshoot?

Some people have a bit of a misguided notion that a headshot is easy to achieve and doesn’t need as much work or thought than a ‘proper portrait’.

But a headshot is a portrait, albeit with a predefined content requirement and style. In many ways this makes it that bit tougher to get something that really stands out. Good headshot photographers know this. Whether it’s for casting purposes or as part of a broader set of publicity shots the photo session has to be approached with clear ideas and attention to detail.

As someone who worked in the entertainment industry for a good number of years I would never approach a headshot session by putting it out to a formula. I’ve seen what the results are like and been on the receiving end of that approach as well. And it often misses the mark.

If you’re an artist of any kind (or even someone looking for corporate headshots) it’s not as simple as finding someone who fits your budget, turning up at the studio or location, click click and you’re done.

That’s winging it too much.

In my experience, a successful headshot or publicity portrait session is based on three things:

  1. The Objective
  2. Preparation
  3. Delivery

Let’s take a look at the first of those and I’ll follow up with the others in subsequent posts.

1 The Objective

You are your brand and (unless you’re a body double) your face is the most important part of that brand when it comes to photography. So what’s your strategy behind having your photos taken?

Okay your current headshots might be out of date. That’s a reason for new shots of course. But perhaps there’s more to it than that? Have you ever asked yourself how you want your audience to see you?

Strong? Funny? Brooding? Quirky? Sexy?

If you’re an actor or stage performer are you more a comedian than a tragedian? Or both?

If you’re a singer or songwriter, what’s the genre you’re associated with and what elements of lighting or location might need to be used in the shot to suggest that?

If you’re already well known (i.e. your ‘brand’ is established) then what do you want to reinforce and what do you want to change or surprise people with?

Where do you want to have these photos seen? And by whom specifically? Discuss with your agent or your manager what will work in terms of how the images will be used in promoting you. The better you know yourself and the clearer your intentions the more that will come across in the final images.

All artists and performers are working in oversubscribed markets. But nowadays you have a great tool at your disposal to help you stand out: content. We live in a content rich age so be content rich yourself. For example, in the UK you can exploit the Spotlight portfolio gallery: fill it with images that show off more than one aspect of who you are and what you’re best at. Gone are the days of the single casting headshot being your only calling card. You need a whole library of content that’s supporting you.

You have a website right? Turn it into the ultimate ‘you machine’ with photos from a variety of shoots and sources (and don’t forget video – but that’s another post).

As a very wise friend reminded me the other day: ‘there’s always more than one road to market’.

So be clear about the objectives of your content and the outcomes will be that much better.

In the next post in this series we’ll take a look at preparing for the shoot including: what to wear and why it’s worth meeting the photographer beforehand.

Of course if you want to dive in and create some headshots together then check out my headshot and portfolio packages here to make a booking or if you just want to ask any questions rising from these posts then feel free to drop me a line.

All images © James Bellorini

James is a commercial, editorial and documentary photographer. He has over ten years experience in the arts and entertainment industries and has worked for internationally recognised brands including Glyndebourne, The Royal Shakespeare Company, and The Old Vic. His portrait and headshot clients include actors, musicians, writers, artists, international singers, entrepreneurs and corporates. He is a member of the Redeye Network and a participant in their Lightbox program for emerging photographers.


STUDIO PORTRAITS

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Images from recent studio portraits photoshoot of actress Caroline O’Hara photographed for her publicity portfolio at Venth Studios, London. More from this shoot on my website here.

All images © James Bellorini. All Rights Reserved.

James is an editorial and documentary photographer working for the commercial and consumer markets. He started shooting professionally in 2013 and has since worked with advertising agencies, design agencies, entrepreneurs, performers, musicians, DJ’s, singers, models, and culture and entertainment organizations/brands. Recent clients include: Innovision, UKTI, Siren Design, Glyndebourne Productions Ltd, Stone Nest, The Old Vic etc. In September 2015 he joined the Redeye Network’s Lightbox programme for emerging photographers. 


LIFESTYLE PHOTO SHOOT, UXBRIDGE

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LIFESTYLE PHOTOSHOOT FOR SIREN DESIGN.


Images from a recent lifestyle photo shoot. This was a commission for Soho based design agency Siren Design. From a brief to provide a series of lifestyle/lookbook images to market an Uxbridge-based client development. We shot in a number of locations around the town. The final images will appear in a Sunday supplement style magazine article. More from the shoot here on the website.

STYLIST: Anne Steggalls.
MODELS: Nina Sever and Ben Irish.
LOCATION: Uxbridge, London UK.

All images shot with Canon 5D MkIII and processed in Lightroom, VSCO, and Alien Skin Exposure 7.

All images © James Bellorini 2015. All Rights Reserved.

James is an editorial and documentary photographer working for the commercial and consumer markets. He started shooting professionally in 2013 and has since worked with advertising agencies, design agencies, entrepreneurs, performers, musicians, DJ’s, singers, models, and culture and entertainment organizations/brands. Recent clients include: Siren Design, Glyndebourne Productions Ltd, Stone Nest, The Old Vic etc.


INSPIRATION HANDBOOK FROM PHOTOSHELTER

The Inspiration Handbook by PhotoshelterPhotoshelter (creators of online portfolio platforms for photographers) have just released the latest in their series of free industry guides: The Inspiration Handbook. It’s full of hints and tips for all manner of photography and business related matters.


The Inspiration Handbook: 50 Tips From 50 Photography Trailblazers is an special one for me as I’m included (on page 24 if you want to know!).

Extra-special because it’s humbling to be included in these pages alongside some incredible photographers and industry professionals. Many of these folks I’ve admired for a long time (e.g. Zack Arias & David Duchemin) and remain my inspirations. I can’t believe I’m on the same pages as these guys!! Pinch me. Seriously.

When I took a change of course in my life 18 months ago, and set out to become a freelance photographer, I had no idea that the road would be one of such a lot of blood (not literally), sweat, (many) tears, self-doubt and financial ups and downs. So I’m really grateful to the people at Photoshelter for acknowledging me in this way. And in this kind of ‘stellar’ company. It really really helps to be encouraged so early in my career.

If you want to see some great photography and pick up some tips for your business (photography or otherwise) then the guide is available to download for free here. It’s worth the click.

 The Inspiration Handbook by Photoshelter